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Master the Katana Curve by dk1luvally Master the Katana Curve by dk1luvally
This method of drawing out a curve is accurate, but somewhat technical and perhaps a little more time consuming. I hope you can make sense of it. Start with measuring 3 inch increments for your columns down the length of the board or blank. You will need a square and a right angle triangle. Find the center of the board, this will be the center of the blade. Starting at the center, 0 (the edge of the board). You may use whatever unit of measurement you like, i typically use Millimeters. In the photo, ive listed the formula for each 3 inch increment so you know how i came up with it, but the important number is the sum which is provided. 0, 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, and 21. Plot your points with the other side and connect the dots :D. This will be the front (actual) edge. Now creating the points for the back edge of the blade is a little more time consuming. You must have a right angle for this step. Refer to the photo, you want to draw a right angle for every point and line you just created. This is how to create the back edge and width of your blade. I usually go with 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 for the width of a standard blade. Authentic Japanese blades sometimes are wider at the base than the tip. But this method is even throughout. By using your triangle to create the back edge points, you are making that edge more accurate and consistent rather than using the original vertical lines you first created to make your front edge. Make sense? I hope this was useful. All thats left is to cut it out using a reciprocating or jig saw. Once cut out and sanded, you wont even be able to tell that your blade is a series of straight lines! Good Luck! If there is anything you dont quite understand, please feel free to ask....

re: edit**** should have mentioned this before. once you have one side plotted and drawn out, make sure you do the same thing to the other side, again starting at the center. thanks^^
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:iconpaul42529:
Paul42529 Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2011
Hello, I am quite confused on those numbers right above the formula. What are those. It says, from the first I can see, 6, 8, 10, 12.
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:icondk1luvally:
dk1luvally Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Hello Paul, i know this is ancient history and you've asked your question a little while back and for this, i must apologize. For what it is worth i will gladly answer your question. Those numbers are actually written sideways. I can see why those numbers appear as you say they look like. I would agree, but they correspond to sums written below. They are sideways is all. Thanks for asking. Others may be wondering the same thing lol, and I wouldn't blame them :D
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:iconenzo61:
enzo61 Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2011
Ok, very good, compliments, you have the design (drawing) of Katana, measures the length.

Thank you, sincerely Enzo from Italy.

enzo.santomarco@virgilio.it
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:iconenzo61:
enzo61 Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2011
Ok, very good, compliments, you have the design (drawing) of Katana, measures the length.

Thank you, sincerely Enzo from Italy.

enzo.santomarco@virgilio.it
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:iconchioky:
chioky Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2009  Student Artisan Crafter
These are some INTENSE measurements, I never knew such hardcore maths could be applied to swordmaking. I wonder how famous japanese sword smiths were able to make their curves, through sheer natural ability...
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:iconkanzen-hokori:
kanzen-hokori Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2009
found al link about it [link]
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:iconkanzen-hokori:
kanzen-hokori Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2009
The cuve of a katana is made by useing clay on the blade at the back much clay and at the front less. When heating the blade with the clay on top and then cooling it the area with less clay cools faster and the back part with much more clay cools less fast becous of this a a cuve apeared.

you know that when you heat steal it expands and when it cools down it shrinks.
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:iconchioky:
chioky Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2009  Student Artisan Crafter
that process, sounds like a very long and time consuming amount of time O.O modern day swordmakers get around that by cutting and shaping it perfectly from the sheet of metal. When it seems the old swordmakers used a simple process, just for a very long time
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:iconvehemas:
Vehemas Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2011   Digital Artist
Well, I know this was long ago, but just wanna add on. The process might seem simple, but it's definitely not the same. the aim of using clay in varying amounts is to make the sword both hard, and tough. The curve was a side effect, it may have been intended, it may not have been intended. Another side effect of the process is the hamon, which you probably know what it is by now. =)
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:iconkanzen-hokori:
kanzen-hokori Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2009
yes but still today some sword makers still use the old fashion way. i think the old fashion way is better because in that way the sword is so perfect.in the link there is a video about the history oft the katana
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:iconkarumaru:
Karumaru Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2009
this is very nice :D very educational :Di might used this one in my next project :D
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:icondk1luvally:
dk1luvally Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2009  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
feel free^^ good to hear that you may put it to good use :D and btw Karu....you scare me! lol jk. Saw all the Cosplay photos, a striking resemblance, i am very impressed. Looks like you are taking full advantage of life and enjoying every minute of it!
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:iconfixinman:
fixinman Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
Or you could just bend a thin piece of wood and trace. Watch the ends though.
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:icondk1luvally:
dk1luvally Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2009  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
lol thanks^^ never really thought about that. after thinking it over carefully, i may take the extra effort and combine the two techniques together for the added level of accuracy and precision. thank you Fixinman
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April 20, 2009
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